3-D Holographic Projection

Holography, from the Greek words for “whole” and “writing/ drawing”, is the technique for creating three-dimensional images. Discovered accidentally by physicist Dennis Gabor in the 1940s, it was only when lasers developed in the 1960s that the first optical hologram was created. Using halogen-based photographic emulsions to record 3-D images on 2-D surfaces, in simple terms holograms split and stretch recorded light into 3-D shapes.

Holography, from the Greek words for “whole” and “writing/ drawing”, is the technique for creating three-dimensional images. Discovered accidentally by physicist Dennis Gabor in the 1940s, it was only when lasers developed in the 1960s that the first optical hologram was created. Using halogen-based photographic emulsions to record 3-D images on 2-D surfaces, in simple terms holograms split and stretch recorded light into 3-D shapes.
Like photographs, holograms record reflected light but when you see a holographic recording, the way it behaves is somewhat different. Unlike a photograph that simply captures the light from a 2-D scene, the hologram records the light like a code and uses the laser light sources to translate that code into a 3-D image.

Today, hologram technology does more than just appear on your credit cards. It used to just be stationary images but now volumetric holograms are being developed to incorporate moving images. “Live stage telepresence” has developed to allow 3-D film recordings to be beamed into areas where other real physical objects appear.
It’s the stuff of science fiction but soon not only we will be able to watch 3-D projected car demos and musical performances, we will be able to have live holographic video feeds where we can talk in virtual real time to people on the other side of the world (or the universe).

The current technology is actually based on a 19th century invention. An illusionary technique called ‘Pepper’s Ghost’, used in theatres and haunted houses in the 19th century, made objects appear, disappear and morph together via a hidden room from which objects are reflected onto the view the audience sees.

The modern technique of holographic projection uses high definition video footage in the same way that Pepper’s Ghost reflected images from one place to another. Using a specially developed foil, images from an HD video projector are reflected in various sizes to control the image you see.

And a ghost is exactly what was seen at Coachella Music Festival in California earlier this year using 3-D holographic projection. Joining rapper Snoop Dogg on stage was Tupac, an artist who has been dead for over 15 years. Spooky.